Significance Of July 4th – USA Independence Day

06 July 2016,   By ,   1 Comments

Independence day, better known as 4th of July, is a federal holiday in the United States. It commemorates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on 4th July, 1776 by the Continental Congress when thirteen colonies became the United States of America and stopped being part of the British Empire. The holiday is usually marked with big parades all over major cities, fireworks and all manner of celebrations. Many use this holiday to reconnect with family and friends by organising parties and different outings.

4th July Independence Day

Happy 4th of July!

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Lesser known facts

1. Independence was gained two days earlier on July 2nd, 1776. The Congress spent the two days debating and revising the Declaration of Independence before its signing.

2. Only a few members of Congress (if any) signed the Declaration of Independence on 4th July. According to historians, most of the signatories did not sign the Declaration until August 2nd, 1776.

3. The first draft by Thomas Jefferson was not in favor of slavery. Even though he owned slaves himself, Thomas Jefferson felt that slavery was against human rights. Delegates who owned slaves were opposed to freeing them and therefore the section did not make it to the final document.

4. over 150 million hotdogs are consumed on this day.

5. Three presidents namely, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and James Monroe died on this day.

6. Calvin Coolidge Jnr., the 30th president of the United States was born on this day.

7. Philippines and Rwanda also celebrate holidays on July 4th.

8. Most flags and fireworks used on this day were made in China.

9. The National Anthem lyrics were set from an official song for a British club.

The 4th of July weekend is usually a big holiday and most US residents know it just for the big parades and parties. There are more facts to this day than many realise! Happy Independence Day to all Americans and we pray for PEACE!

1 Comment:

  1. Dedicated servers says:

    From the outset, Americans celebrated independence on July 4, the date shown on the much-publicized Declaration of Independence, rather than on July 2, the date the resolution of independence was approved in a closed session of Congress.

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